SQL – Reporting Services Error – Keyset does not exist

Recently while working with an third party vendor we came across and issue where the SQL Reporting Services displayed the error below when attempting to browse to the ReportServer:

The report server was unable to validate the integrity of the encrypted data in the database. (rsCannotValidateEncryptedData) Keyset does not exist (Exception from HRESULT: 0x80090016)

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I first attempted to delete the encryption keys from the Reporting Services Configuration Manager but I was unable to do so. This wasn’t really ideal but since the server was not 100% in production now would be the time to take such a measure.

Below was the error:

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I then recalled that when I initially set up SSRS I had used a different service account for the Reporting Service. It was changed at the vendor’s request.  Once I had changed back the login account to the previous setup account the error was resolved.

Moving forward though I believe if I where to use a new account then the encryption keys would need to be deleted and SSRS would need to be reconfigured with that new account.

SQL – How to transfer logins and passwords between SQL servers

When migrating databases to another server it is important to transfer the login information as well, otherwise it will have to be recreated which may cause issues if the database password is hardcoded somewhere in an application .ini or .config file.  Transferring also helps when the IT team that installed that third party database is no longer around and did not document the password information.

In order to implement this run the following script on your source SQL server.

USE master
GO
IF OBJECT_ID (‘sp_hexadecimal’) IS NOT NULL
DROP PROCEDURE sp_hexadecimal
GO
CREATE PROCEDURE sp_hexadecimal
@binvalue varbinary(256),
@hexvalue varchar (514) OUTPUT
AS
DECLARE @charvalue varchar (514)
DECLARE @i int
DECLARE @length int
DECLARE @hexstring char(16)
SELECT @charvalue = ‘0x’
SELECT @i = 1
SELECT @length = DATALENGTH (@binvalue)
SELECT @hexstring = ‘0123456789ABCDEF’
WHILE (@i <= @length)
BEGIN
DECLARE @tempint int
DECLARE @firstint int
DECLARE @secondint int
SELECT @tempint = CONVERT(int, SUBSTRING(@binvalue,@i,1))
SELECT @firstint = FLOOR(@tempint/16)
SELECT @secondint = @tempint – (@firstint*16)
SELECT @charvalue = @charvalue +
SUBSTRING(@hexstring, @firstint+1, 1) +
SUBSTRING(@hexstring, @secondint+1, 1)
SELECT @i = @i + 1
END

SELECT @hexvalue = @charvalue
GO

IF OBJECT_ID (‘sp_help_revlogin’) IS NOT NULL
DROP PROCEDURE sp_help_revlogin
GO
CREATE PROCEDURE sp_help_revlogin @login_name sysname = NULL AS
DECLARE @name sysname
DECLARE @type varchar (1)
DECLARE @hasaccess int
DECLARE @denylogin int
DECLARE @is_disabled int
DECLARE @PWD_varbinary varbinary (256)
DECLARE @PWD_string varchar (514)
DECLARE @SID_varbinary varbinary (85)
DECLARE @SID_string varchar (514)
DECLARE @tmpstr varchar (1024)
DECLARE @is_policy_checked varchar (3)
DECLARE @is_expiration_checked varchar (3)

DECLARE @defaultdb sysname

IF (@login_name IS NULL)
DECLARE login_curs CURSOR FOR

SELECT p.sid, p.name, p.type, p.is_disabled, p.default_database_name, l.hasaccess, l.denylogin FROM
sys.server_principals p LEFT JOIN sys.syslogins l
ON ( l.name = p.name ) WHERE p.type IN ( ‘S’, ‘G’, ‘U’ ) AND p.name <> ‘sa’
ELSE
DECLARE login_curs CURSOR FOR
SELECT p.sid, p.name, p.type, p.is_disabled, p.default_database_name, l.hasaccess, l.denylogin FROM
sys.server_principals p LEFT JOIN sys.syslogins l
ON ( l.name = p.name ) WHERE p.type IN ( ‘S’, ‘G’, ‘U’ ) AND p.name = @login_name
OPEN login_curs

FETCH NEXT FROM login_curs INTO @SID_varbinary, @name, @type, @is_disabled, @defaultdb, @hasaccess, @denylogin
IF (@@fetch_status = -1)
BEGIN
PRINT ‘No login(s) found.’
CLOSE login_curs
DEALLOCATE login_curs
RETURN -1
END
SET @tmpstr = ‘/* sp_help_revlogin script ‘
PRINT @tmpstr
SET @tmpstr = ‘** Generated ‘ + CONVERT (varchar, GETDATE()) + ‘ on ‘ + @@SERVERNAME + ‘ */’
PRINT @tmpstr
PRINT ”
WHILE (@@fetch_status <> -1)
BEGIN
IF (@@fetch_status <> -2)
BEGIN
PRINT ”
SET @tmpstr = ‘– Login: ‘ + @name
PRINT @tmpstr
IF (@type IN ( ‘G’, ‘U’))
BEGIN — NT authenticated account/group

SET @tmpstr = ‘CREATE LOGIN ‘ + QUOTENAME( @name ) + ‘ FROM WINDOWS WITH DEFAULT_DATABASE = [‘ + @defaultdb + ‘]’
END
ELSE BEGIN — SQL Server authentication
— obtain password and sid
SET @PWD_varbinary = CAST( LOGINPROPERTY( @name, ‘PasswordHash’ ) AS varbinary (256) )
EXEC sp_hexadecimal @PWD_varbinary, @PWD_string OUT
EXEC sp_hexadecimal @SID_varbinary,@SID_string OUT

— obtain password policy state
SELECT @is_policy_checked = CASE is_policy_checked WHEN 1 THEN ‘ON’ WHEN 0 THEN ‘OFF’ ELSE NULL END FROM sys.sql_logins WHERE name = @name
SELECT @is_expiration_checked = CASE is_expiration_checked WHEN 1 THEN ‘ON’ WHEN 0 THEN ‘OFF’ ELSE NULL END FROM sys.sql_logins WHERE name = @name

SET @tmpstr = ‘CREATE LOGIN ‘ + QUOTENAME( @name ) + ‘ WITH PASSWORD = ‘ + @PWD_string + ‘ HASHED, SID = ‘ + @SID_string + ‘, DEFAULT_DATABASE = [‘ + @defaultdb + ‘]’

IF ( @is_policy_checked IS NOT NULL )
BEGIN
SET @tmpstr = @tmpstr + ‘, CHECK_POLICY = ‘ + @is_policy_checked
END
IF ( @is_expiration_checked IS NOT NULL )
BEGIN
SET @tmpstr = @tmpstr + ‘, CHECK_EXPIRATION = ‘ + @is_expiration_checked
END
END
IF (@denylogin = 1)
BEGIN — login is denied access
SET @tmpstr = @tmpstr + ‘; DENY CONNECT SQL TO ‘ + QUOTENAME( @name )
END
ELSE IF (@hasaccess = 0)
BEGIN — login exists but does not have access
SET @tmpstr = @tmpstr + ‘; REVOKE CONNECT SQL TO ‘ + QUOTENAME( @name )
END
IF (@is_disabled = 1)
BEGIN — login is disabled
SET @tmpstr = @tmpstr + ‘; ALTER LOGIN ‘ + QUOTENAME( @name ) + ‘ DISABLE’
END
PRINT @tmpstr
END

FETCH NEXT FROM login_curs INTO @SID_varbinary, @name, @type, @is_disabled, @defaultdb, @hasaccess, @denylogin
END
CLOSE login_curs
DEALLOCATE login_curs
RETURN 0
GO

Once that is complete then run the following command.

exec sp_help_revlogin ‘username’

This will generate output which you then copy and run on the destination SQL server.

All this can also be done more elegantly with Powershell. Check out this link below:

https://blog.netnerds.net/2016/06/its-2016-why-is-sp_help_revlogin-a-thing/

 

SQL Server – How to Truncate Logs (.LDF) file.

The simple straight forward method to truncate logs in the occasion where you find yourself running out of disk space and do not have additional free space to spare.

Open SQL Studio > Select the database in question > Right click and Select Properties

From the Database Properties Window select Option and change the Recovery model to Simple.

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Select OK

Then Right click the database and select Tasks > Shrink > Files. Change the File Type to Log > Select OK

This will truncate the .ldf file.